Review of Michael Horton, Christless Christianity: The Alternative Gospel of the American Church

Review of Michael Horton, Christless Christianity: The Alternative Gospel of the American Church

Review of Michael Horton, Christless Christianity: The Alternative Gospel of the American Church1 by John M. Frame     The title of this book is alarming, certainly by design. But the subtitle is even more so. Does it mean that the whole American church (all traditions, denominations, locations) is committed to an “alternative Gospel?” Or is it that, though part of the American church upholds the true, biblical gospel, there is within that church a movement (evidently a significant movement) to...

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Review of R. Scott Clark, Recovering the Reformed Confession: Our Theology, Piety, and Practice

Review of R. Scott Clark, Recovering the Reformed Confession: Our Theology, Piety, and Practice

Review of R. Scott Clark, Recovering the Reformed Confession: Our Theology, Piety, and Practice1 by John M. Frame A friend told me that this book should have been titled, “why John Frame is wrong about absolutely everything.” Well, that overstates Clark’s interest in me and understates his other concerns in this book. He has bigger fish to fry than yours truly. But there are nine references to me in the index, only one leading to a favorable mention, and I will not ignore those in this review. More...

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Law and Gospel

Law and Gospel

by John M. Frame   It has become increasingly common in Reformed circles, as it has long been in Lutheran circles, to say that the distinction between law and gospel is the key to sound theology, even to say that to differ with certain traditional formulations of this distinction is to deny the gospel itself. Sometimes this argument employs Scripture passages like Rom. 3:21-31, emphasizing that we are saved by God’s grace, through faith alone, apart from the works of the law. In my judgment, however, none...

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Is Natural Revelation Sufficient to Govern Culture?

Is Natural Revelation Sufficient to Govern Culture?

Is Natural Revelation Sufficient to Govern Culture?1   by John M. Frame The titular question seems to me to be central in the current discussion in the Reformed camp between Kuyperians and Klineans. Kuyperians argue that Scripture governs all aspects of human life, including culture and government.2 Klineans3 believe that politics and general culture are governed by natural revelation and common grace.4 On their view Christians should not urge distinctively biblical principles upon the institutions of the broad...

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In Defense of Christian Activism vs. Michael Horton and Meredith Kline

In Defense of Christian Activism vs. Michael Horton and Meredith Kline

In Defense of Christian Activism vs. Michael Horton and Meredith Kline1 by John M. Frame Christian activism, by which I mean simply any Christian attempt to improve society, has had its ups and downs over the centuries. If you read a book like D. James Kennedy and Jerry Newcombe, What If Jesus Had Never Been Born,2 you should be impressed at the great influence of the Christian gospel, and specifically Calvinism, upon western culture. I don’t want to minimize the wickedness of fallen culture. But for now...

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Above the Battle?

Above the Battle?

by John Frame [Photocopied for worship course.]   Several recent books on the “worship wars” have sought to transcend the partisan arguments to find the basic theological principles that should constrain all Christian worshipers, “common criteria” that should help Christians come to greater agreement. Marva Dawn claims to have done that in her Reaching Out Without Dumbing Down,1 but in my judgment she ended up writing a rather partisan tract for a traditional approach to worship.2 In her more...

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